Reading “The Kindly Ones: 4”

There’s a subplot in The Kindly Ones involving Lucifer’s bar Lux in the early chapters that leaves me unsure how it fits into the larger story.  Lyta’s dinner meeting with her potential employer in issue 57 happens at Lux (we get a couple pages devoted to Lucifer being gloriously snarky to a couple who are out celebrating the woman’s birthday; he foretells that their evening won’t end happily, and a snippet from the news in issue 58 indicates that the man drowns after falling overboard on a romantic boat ride following their dinner; this whole sequence is darkly funny, but it doesn’t have much apparent relevance to the story), and now in this issue we get to see a meeting between Lucifer and one of the angels whom have been appointed to replace him as rulers of Hell, Remiel.  The last time we saw Remiel in any depth was at the end of Season of Mists when Dream agreed to let him and Duma take possession of Hell on God’s orders.  It’s worth recalling that even then, Remiel was visibly upset with his orders, and he engaged in some pretty twisted rationalization to make it palatable.

Remiel gets told, and in the background Mazikeen stays cool. (Artwork by Marc Hempel)

Here in the present, we find that Remiel is still super bummed about running Hell, and he’s come, among other things, to ask Lucifer if he’s ever considered returning to his old job.  This one question, which is really the most important thing to Remiel about the whole exchange if I had to judge, is wedged in between talk about the new redemptive purpose of Hell under Remiel and Duma’s supervision and Lucifer unloading a vicious analysis of Remiel’s character (Lucifer’s verdict: Remiel’s a spineless coward).  The question marks an inflection point in the conversation where Remiel has clearly lost control (honestly, he didn’t have control of the conversation before that point, but he hadn’t exhausted Lucifer’s patience yet), and it rapidly goes downhill.  When Remiel tries to reassert himself (by rashly spitting in Lucifer’s face, of all things), he’s subjected to one last humiliation when Lucifer explains that just because he gave up ruling Hell doesn’t mean he also gave up all of his vast power as the only being to ever credibly threaten God, and it’s really only God’s protection that keeps him from erasing Remiel from existence.

This whole scene is a fascinating look at a minor character dealing with a crap hand (remember, I said way back at the end of Season of Mists that Remiel was screwed over by God, who’s a jerk in Gaiman’s universe).  Lucifer’s not wrong about Remiel being a coward who just wants to save face, but I do feel bad for him; it’d be so much better if Hell could just be shut down or, barring that, letting the inhabitants run it instead of making Remiel and Duma do the job.

And for all that, I still don’t know why this scene is here at all.  It calls back to Season of Mists, but it calls back to a portion that doesn’t directly impact the ongoing plot regarding Lyta Hall and Dream (Remiel doesn’t even get around to asking Lucifer about that whole thing).

Speaking of Lyta, her descent into madness hits a new low here.  After she learned from the detectives that Daniel has been burned to death, she goes on something of a walkabout, wandering around the city having visions of mythical figures that are vaguely connected to her surroundings.  Because we’re talking about The Sandman, Lyta’s delirium isn’t just simple madness.  On some level, her interactions with the mythological are really happening, and in the course of her wanderings she encounters two of the Gorgons, Stheno and Euryale.  They’re the first ones in Lyta’s journey that are able to offer her some help in finding the Furies Kind Ladies while offering to let her be their new sister, since the last one was killed.

The scene with Stheno and Euryale is visually interesting because it’s set inside a darkened house where the sisters are dressed in a way that’s directly reminiscent of the lovers Chantal and Zelda who were residents in the boarding house where Rose Walker lived during the Doll’s House arc way back at the series’s beginning.  This is another odd callback in the middle of an issue that feels like it’s doing a lot of setup for the things that will be coming up soon.  In one sense I can see the thematic significance; Gaiman’s been building a case for a mystical connective tissue between all of his biologically female characters for a long time, so connecting the Gorgons with Chantal and Zelda almost seems like an “of course” moment, especially since their connection as lovers was originally obscured when they first appeared.  That the callback happens in this issue, where we finally learn that Daniel’s babysitter on the night he was abducted was Rose Walker, makes further sense; Rose has her own plot thread to follow (she was the keystone in Desire’s first plan to get Dream to kill a member of their family), and doing a callback to some of the weirder characters from her story goes a long way to make it all feel more tightly woven together.

Shut up, Merv. (Artwork by Marc Hempel)

Going back to Dream, the only real development we have in his plot here is that he finally finishes remaking the Corinthian.  We’ll see some interesting things with this character in the future, but for now he’s just there at the end, ready to go with his three creepy smiles.  For Dream’s part, the only really interesting character bit is his observation that while the Dreaming reflects his mood, he also reflects the Dreaming’s.  It’s easy to forget that the Endless are anthropomorphic personifications of universal ideas, and this means that even as we’ve been getting to know the aspects they present as the characters in the book, they also respond to larger things than just what they experience personally.  Mervyn Pumpkinhead observes that the Dreaming’s been acting strangely lately, and Dream confirms that he doesn’t really have any control over recent phenomena.  Gaiman’s universe is aware that something big is about to happen, and we’re seeing ripples of it all over the place.

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