Reading “The Darkness of Mere Being”

Laurie Juspeczyk suffers as a character through most of Watchmen because so much of what we see of her is through the eyes of various men in her life.  She’s depicted largely as an object of sexual desire for Dan Dreiberg and a human anchor for Jon Osterman.  Rorschach doesn’t like her (Rorschach doesn’t like any women), and Edward Blake’s life is lived mostly outside her sphere.  The only male character’s eyes we don’t get to see Juspeczyk through is Adrian Veidt (his focus issue is coming up in a bit).  Juspeczyk exists at a remove from the reader until this issue, and I think that’s a disservice to her.  We spend so much time seeing how other characters see her that her own character feels a little cloudy at times.  Even this issue, which is supposed to be her big set piece and origin story, turns on a revelation that feels like it has way more repercussions for her mother than for her.

Not pictured: Jon Osterman’s flat “No.” (Artwork & letters by Dave Gibbons, colors by John Higgins)

In a way, this filtering of Juspeczyk’s story is a fitting way to portray her.  In the broad list of motivations for why different people become superheroes, hers boils down simply to this: her mother wanted her to.  There are parts of the adventuring life that she enjoys herself, but every moment in the series where her reasons are interrogated, Juspeczyk never suggests a great passion or deep-seated psychological need was the reason she put on a costume and beat up criminals.  The core parts of Juspeczyk’s identity that we see depicted are her ambivalence about her relationship with her mother and her ambivalence about being a superhero.  These complex, contradictory feelings allow us to see Juspeczyk both scolding her mother Sally Jupiter for reveling in her own glory days (including her status as a one-time sex symbol) and lashing out in defense of Jupiter whenever anyone brings up Edward Blake’s attempted rape of her.  It’s these same feelings that have Juspeczyk enjoying an evening of superheroics with Dan Dreiberg after she’s said with all sincerity that she doesn’t mind being retired.

Unfortunately, ambivalence is really the fullest depth we get to see of Juspeczyk’s character.  Her focus issue, while it does explore her origins (and emphasizes that Juspeczyk was pushed into the adventuring life rather than having chosen it), is most specifically concerned with her relationship to two men: Jon Osterman and Edward Blake.  Osterman has been Juspeczyk’s romantic partner for nearly twenty years, and while the events of Watchmen show her finally leaving him after she gets fed up with his detachment, he still requires her assistance to make up his mind about intervening in the ongoing world events on Earth.  Blake, we learn here, is Juspeczyk’s biological father.  Caught between these two men, the issue drags Juspeczyk, in the middle of attempting to cobble together a new life for herself, back into her past.  It’s an unfair situation for her, and it’s exacerbated by Osterman’s callousness and Blake’s looming legacy.

The thing that most consistently impresses me about Gibbons and Higgins’s art is how they work in details that suggest Juspeczyk’s relation to Blake, like their similarly textured and colored hair. (Artwork & letters by Dave Gibbons, colors by John Higgins)

On the subject of Blake’s relation to Juspeczyk, I feel ambivalent myself.  There’s a lot of complexity in the relationship between Juspeczyk’s parents, and I’m not really sure what to make of it.  Sally Jupiter is a victim of sexual assault at the hands of Edward Blake, and despite that she chose at least once to have consensual sex with him.  This decision isn’t so hard to parse; many victims of sexual assault do have ongoing sexual relationships with their attackers because of survival needs and the dynamics that emerge in abusive relationships.  Even Jupiter’s lifelong ambivalence towards Blake is understandable (we see in this issue that she cycled between hating him and feeling some sort of pity for him).  What confounds me is the issue’s resolution where Osterman, finally moved to wonder by the fact that Juspeczyk is the unlikely offspring of two people who shouldn’t have had reason to be together, decides that humanity is worth saving after all.  It feels like there’s a thin line between marveling at the unpredictability of human behavior (though I don’t think we’re that unpredictable) and marveling at the fact that Juspeczyk’s the result of a would-be rapist finally having sex with his victim.

Altogether, this issue is a difficult one to process.  It has some truly lovely character moments, but they all, unfortunately, fall to characters beside our focal point.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s